Table

 

Sulphur-bellied Flycatcher – Accepted

1. 22 Sep–05 Oct 1974

 

Big Sycamore Canyon VEN

1974-069

3

 

2. 06–09 Oct 1978

 

Goleta SBA

1978-131

5

ph., Roberson (1980)

3. 07 Oct 1979

 

Pt. Loma SD

1980-159

6

 

4. 16–20 Sep 1983

 

Pt. Loma SD

1983-068

9

ph.

5. 08 Oct 1983

 

Wilmington LA

1983-116

9

 

6. 23–28 Sep 1990

HY

Goleta SBA

1990-163

16

Fig. 352, ph., AB 45:177

7. 13 Sep 1991

 

Huntington Beach ORA

1991-203

17

 

8. 20 Oct 1991

 

San Pedro LA

1991-187

17

 

9. 25 Sep 1993

HY

Pt. Reyes MRN

1993-169

19

ph., Erickson & Terrill (1996)

10. 06–10 Oct 1993

AHY

Bolinas Lagoon MRN

1993-155

19

ph., AB 48:149, Erickson &Terrill (1996)

11. 20 Oct 1993

 

Los Osos SLO

1994-039

19

 

12. 27–29 Sep 1997

 

Bodega Bay SON

1997-138

23

 

13. 14 Jun 1998

 

Gazos Creek SM

1998-106

24

ph.

14. 18–20 Sep 1999

HY

Pescadero Creek SM

2000-034

25

video

 

Sulphur-bellied Flycatcher – Not accepted, identification not established

? Oct 1989

 

San Diego SD

1990-014

15

 

26 Sep 1995

 

Twentynine Palms SBE

1996-050

22

 

01 Oct 1996

 

Pt. Reyes MRN

1997-055

22

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figures

Image3131.TIF

Figure 351. Apart from a spring vagrant found on 14 June 1998 at Gazos Creek in San Mateo County, all California records of the Sulphur-bellied Flycatcher fall between 13 September and 20 October.

 

Image3131.TIF

Figure 352. This first-fall Sulphur-bellied Flycatcher, aged by its tapered rectrices, was photographed on 26 September 1990 in Goleta, Santa Barbara County (1990-163; Richard G. Jeffers).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sulphur-bellied Flycatcher

SULPHUR-BELLIED FLYCATCHER Myiodynastes luteiventris Sclater, 1859

Accepted: 14 (82%)

Treated in Appendix H: yes

Not accepted: 3

CBRC review: all records

Not submitted/reviewed: 0

Color image: page H-24

This flycatcher breeds from southeastern (and recently central) Arizona southward along Mexico’s Pacific slope, and from eastern Nuevo León southward along Mexico’s Atlantic slope, to Costa Rica. The wintering grounds are in northern South America. In the West, the species occurs casually from Colorado (NAB 57:90, 143) to northwestern Baja California (NAB 57:121, 122); records are also scattered from New Mexico eastward to southern Florida. Individuals have wandered remarkably far north, to southern Ontario, Massachusetts, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Newfoundland.

Starting with the first record—of a bird present from 22 September to 5 October 1974 at Big Sycamore Canyon, Ventura County—the Sulphur-bellied Flycatcher has established a neat pattern of vagrancy to coastal California (Figure 351). Apart from a 14 June 1998 record of an apparent spring overshoot at Gazos Creek in San Mateo County, all have occurred between 13 September and 20 October. This flycatcher’s pattern of fall dispersal to California closely resembles that of another Middle American species, the Yellow-green Vireo (cf. Figure 370). California’s first eight Sulphur-bellied Flycatchers were found between San Diego and Santa Barbara Counties, but each of the six records since 1991 comes from farther north; see also Appendix H.

The Variegated Flycatcher (Empidonomus varius) and Piratic Flycatcher (Legatus leucophaius) both bear superficial resemblances to the Sulphur-bellied, and each has been recorded in the United States (Abbott and Finch 1978, AOU 1998, Lockwood 2000). Even more similar is the Streaked Flycatcher (M. maculatus), a migratory species that breeds north to eastern Mexico and is as yet unrecorded in the United States. Observers should be aware of the possibility of these species eventually reaching California. See Howell and Webb (1994, 1995) and Erickson and Terrill (1996) for information on identification.