Table

 

Eurasian Collared-Dove – Accepted

1-2. 13 May 2001–09 Jul 2002+

2

Ridgecrest KER

2002-121

28

ph.

3-4. 07 Aug 2001

2

vic. El Centro IMP

2002-034

28

 

5. 02 Nov 2001

 

Desert Center RIV

2002-031

28

ph.

6. 08 Mar 2002

 

vic. Bishop INY

2002-044

28

 

7-9. 04 May 2002

3

Calipatria IMP

2002-117

28

 

10-18. 19 May 2002

9

Blythe RIV

2002-123

28

video

19-68. 27–28 Dec 2002

50

Calipatria IMP

2002-117A

28

Fig. 185, Cole & McCaskie (2004)

 

Eurasian Collared-Dove – Not accepted, identification not established

24 Feb 2001

2

Brawley IMP

2001-072

28

 

29 Jul 2001

 

Pt. Reyes Station MRN

2001-124

28

 

 

Eurasian Collared-Dove – Not accepted, “natural” occurrence questionable (identification established)

15 Mar–25 May 1998

2–3

vic. Lancaster LA

2001-089

28

nesting

18 Jul–25 Aug 1999

male

Brawley IMP

1999-140

28

ph., nested with African Collared-Dove

29 May–01 Jun 2002

 

Chula Vista SD

2002-112

28

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figures

Image3131.TIF

Figure 185. These Eurasian Collared-Doves—playing their role in the species’ impressive westward expansion—were photographed on 28 December 2002 in Calipatria, Imperial County, a part of the state where their population is exploding (2002-117A; Joseph Morlan).

 

 

 

 

 

Eurasian Collared-Dove

EURASIAN COLLARED-DOVE Streptopelia decaocto (Frivaldszky, 1838)

Accepted: 68 (91%)

Treated in Appendix H: no

Not accepted: 7

CBRC review: records from 1998 through 2002

Not submitted/reviewed: NA

Color image: none

This dove is abundant across most of Europe, the Middle East, and southern Asia east to Sri Lanka and Myanmar. Expansion to Egypt and Europe began in the 1930s and may have resulted from introductions, at least in part. In the New World, the species was introduced in the Bahamas during the early 1970s, spread to Florida and elsewhere in the Caribbean by the early 1980s, and by the early 2000s occupied most of the southern and central United States (Smith 1987, Romagosa and McEneaney 1999, Romagosa 2002, Sibley 2003a). By 2006, the species was widespread across much of the Southwest and southern Great Basin, with many scattered records west to the Pacific coast and north to the Canadian border.

California’s oldest breeding population of the Eurasian Collared-Dove has been established since at least 1992 in Ventura, Ventura County, and is believed to be descended from locally released or escaped birds (Romagosa and McEneaney 1999). As reviewed by Cole and McCaskie (2004), breeding populations have now spread northward along the coast to San Luis Obispo County, perhaps representing the Ventura lineage. A small population near King City in Monterey County seems to have originated with birds intentionally released there in 1999 (Roberson 2002), and another local release apparently gave rise to a small population in Morgan Hill, Santa Clara County (Hampton 2006).

Starting in 2001, a surge in records from southeastern California implied that Eurasian Collared-Doves were also dispersing into the state from the east (Cole and McCaskie 2004). Two Eurasian Collared-Doves found on 13 May 2001 in Ridgecrest, Kern County, were the first to be accepted as probably having originated outside of the state. Populations with apparently “wild” origins already seem to be established at Blythe and Desert Center in Riverside County and across much of the Imperial Valley in Imperial County. As documented by Hampton (2006), records in the Central Valley “began to rise in 2004 and increased dramatically in the following years,” although as of 2006 the records were “not concentrated in any particular region.” San Clemente Island in Los Angeles County claims the first documented records away from the mainland: 5 July 2002 and 4–8 July 2003 (Sullivan and Kershner 2005).

Both domesticated African Collared-Doves (S. roseogrisea)—formerly called Ringed Turtle-Doves (S. risoria)—and hybrids (S. decaocto × S. roseogrisea) occur in California and may be mistaken for Eurasian Collared-Doves. In 1999 a mixed pair fledged two young at Brawley, Imperial County, and in 2002 three apparent hybrid adults were observed at nearby Calipatria (Cole and McCaskie 2004). See also Hampton (2006).