Table

 

Lesser Sand-Plover – Accepted

1. 13–19 Sep 1980

HY

Moss Landing MTY

1980-176

5

Fig. 108, ph., sketch in Luther et al. (1983)

2. 07–13 Aug 1982

AHY

Santa Clara R. mouth VEN

1982-074

8

ph.

and 26 Jul–02 Aug 1983

 

 

1983-065

9

 

and 12–17 Jul 1986

 

 

1986-300

12

ph., AB 37:224

3. 14–16 Aug 1989

AHY

Moss Landing MTY

1989-109

13

ph.

4. 22–25 Sep 1989

HY

Pt. Reyes MRN

1989-132

15

ph.

5. 16–20 Sep 1992

HY

Moss Landing MTY

1992-250

18

Fig. 213, ph., AB 47:166, Heindel & Patten (1996), Roberson (2002)

6. 03–07 Sep 1995

HY

vic. Oxnard VEN

1995-098

21

Fig. 112, ph., FN 50:114

7. 02–03 Sep 1996

HY

Bodega Bay SON

1996-118

24

 

8. 02–03 Oct 1998

HY

Eel R. Wildlife Area HUM

1998-150

24

 

9. 22 Oct 2003

HY

Abbotts Lagoon MRN

2003-164

29

 

 

Lesser Sand-Plover – Not accepted, identification not established

17 Jul 1999

 

Bolsa Chica ORA

1999-141

25

 

 

Lesser Sand-Plover – Not submitted

03 Oct 1980

 

Moss Landing MTY

 

14

Roberson (2002), see table entry 1

 

 

 

 

 

Figures

Image3131.TIF

Figure 108. California’s first record of the Lesser Sand-Plover (formerly the Mongolian Plover) is of a first-fall bird sketched on 13 September 1980, the day of its discovery at Moss Landing, Monterey County (1980-176; Donna L. Dittmann).

For a larger view, click on the image above.

 

Image3131.TIF

Figures 109-111. North America’s only record of the Greater Sand-Plover refers to this first-winter bird, which was present from 29 January to 8 April 2001 at Bolinas Lagoon in Marin County (2001-033). These detailed field sketches were made on 13 February 2001 (Steve N. G. Howell).The flight shot was taken 1 February (Larry Sansone) and the standing bird was photographed 5 February (Peter LaTourrette). The bird’s identification was confirmed by in-hand examination. Compare its structure against the depictions of Lesser Sand-Plovers on the opposite page and in Figures 112 and 213.

For a larger view, click on the image above.

 

Image3131.TIF

Figure 110.

 

Image3131.TIF

Figure 111.

 

Image3131.TIF

Figure 112. The Lesser Sand-Plover is a very rare fall vagrant to California. Seven of the nine records accepted through 2003 involve first-fall birds such as this one, photographed on 7 September 1995 near Oxnard in Ventura County (1995-098; Don DesJardin).

 

Image3131.TIF

Figure 213. Note the apricot wash across the breast and forehead of this first-fall Lesser Sand-Plover. This bird was photographed on 20 September 1992, at the end of a five-day stopover in Moss Landing, Monterey County (1992-250; Monte M. Taylor).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lesser Sand-Plover

LESSER SAND-PLOVER Charadrius mongolus Pallas, 1776

Accepted: 9 (90%)

Treated in Appendix H: yes

Not accepted: 1

CBRC review: all records

Not submitted/reviewed: 1

Color images: see Figures and H-17

This small plover’s atrifrons group, the Tibetan Plover, breeds in central Eurasia; the mongolus group, or Mongolian Plover, breeds in northeastern Eurasia including extreme northeastern Siberia, and a few pairs have been found breeding in northern and western Alaska. The Tibetan Plover’s wintering grounds stretch along the coast of the Indian Ocean from South Africa to Indonesia; Mongolian Plovers winter across the western Pacific Ocean from southern Japan (Brazil 1991) south to Australia. Mongolians are rare, regular migrants through the Aleutian Islands and islands of the Bering Sea but are not encountered annually on Alaska’s mainland; fall vagrants occur casually farther south along the Pacific coast. Other New World records, including some in spring, come from Hawaii, Alberta, Ontario, Rhode Island (NAB 53:365), New Jersey, Louisiana, and Florida (NAB 60:58).

California’s first Lesser Sand-Plover was a first-fall bird present from 13 to 19 September 1980 at Moss Landing, Monterey County. Fall migrants account for all California records—adults from 12 July to 16 August, and first-fall birds from 2 September to 22 October; see also Appendix H. Much of the adult’s date range was established by a bird that returned to the Santa Clara River estuary in Ventura County during three different years in the 1980s. The bird was not banded or otherwise distinctively marked, but the CBRC considered it likely that a single individual was involved due to the species’ extreme scarcity in the state and its recurrence at this location (Langham 1991). By 1986 the bird was at least six years old. Most birds in juvenal plumage have had crisp feathering, but at least some of the birds found later in fall have been worn and/or already molting into formative plumage.