Table

 

Oriental Turtle-Dove – Accepted

1. 29 Oct 1988

 

Furnace Creek Ranch INY

1988-246

16,30

 

2. 09–31 December 2002

HY

Bolinas MRN

2003-036

29

Fig. 184, video

 

 

 

 

 

Figure

Image3131.TIF

Figure 184. California’s second accepted Oriental Turtle-Dove, at Bolinas, Marin County, as depicted from video that the artist took through a spotting scope on 10 December 2002 (2003-036; Keith Hansen).

 

 

 

 

 

Oriental Turtle-Dove

ORIENTAL TURTLE-DOVE Streptopelia orientalis (Latham, 1790)

Accepted: 2 (100%)

Treated in Appendix H: no

Not accepted: 0

CBRC review: all records

Not submitted/reviewed: 0

Color image: none

This dove is resident in southern and eastern Asia, areas that receive wintering birds from more northerly breeding populations in northern Japan and Siberia. Vagrants are found very rarely in Europe, and they have reached the Pribilof and Aleutian Islands between 20 May and 26 July (ABA 2002). Farther south in the New World, one was photographed at Vancouver Island, British Columbia, 15–25 August 1992 (Campbell et al. 2001, natural occurrence questioned by the AOU 1998).

When the CBRC considered California’s first report of an Oriental Turtle-Dove—a bird seen by multiple observers on 29 October 1988 at Furnace Creek Ranch, Inyo County—the identification was questioned by three members who did not believe that the descriptions adequately documented the first record of this dove for the contiguous United States. Of the remaining seven members, four questioned the natural occurrence of such a bird. Fourteen years later, however, from 9 to 31 December 2002, another Oriental Turtle-Dove was photographed, recorded on video, and closely studied on private property in Bolinas, Marin County (Figure 184). Most of the eight members who voted to endorse the Bolinas record as probably involving a natural vagrant noted that this was a first-winter bird showing typical molt patterns, and that appeared consistent with the migratory subspecies, S. o. orientalis. Having established this precedent, the CBRC decided to reconsider the Furnace Creek record, and this time nine members voted to endorse the bird’s identification and eight voted to endorse the bird’s likelihood of natural occurrence.

A 10 March 2005 query of the International Species Information System (http://isis.org) yielded no record of captive Oriental Turtle-Doves at zoos or other participating institutions in North America.

 

[AFRICAN COLLARED-DOVE Streptopelia roseogrisea (Linnaeus, 1758) – see hypothetical section]