Table

 

Pyrrhuloxia – Accepted

1. 24 Feb–08 Mar 1971

male

Heise Springs IMP

1971-002

1

 

and 31 Dec 1971–27 Mar 1972

 

 

1972-002

1

 

and 22 Jan–23 Mar 1973

 

 

1984-079

10

 

2. 17 Dec 1972–19 Feb 1973

male

Calipatria IMP

1985-143

10

ph.

3. 23 May 1974

female

Brock Research Center IMP

1974-064

3

 

4. 14 Jul 1974

male

Palo Verde IMP

1974-072

3

site not in RIV, cf. Luther et al. (1979)

5. 18 Jul 1974

male

Westmorland IMP

1974-070

3

 

6-7. 06 Jun–23 Jul 1977

male

Chemehuevi Wash SBE

1977-067

4

Roberson (1980); & on nest on 23 July (K. Van Vuren in litt.)

8-9. 23 Jul 1982

male

Corona RIV

1983-013

10

 

10. 07–10 May 1983

female

Wilsona Gardens, Antelope Valley LA

1983-117

11

 

11. 14 May 1983

female

Chemehuevi Wash SBE

1987-313

14

 

12. 26–27 May 1983

male

Encinitas SD

1986-089

11

 

13. 01 Jun 1986

male

Cottonwood Spring RIV

1986-372

11

 

14. 19–23 Jul 1990

AHY male

San Miguel I. SBA

1990-140

16

ph., AB 44:1188

15-18. 28 May–08 Jul 1995

femalemalemalemale

Chemehuevi Wash SBE

1995-056

21

Fig. 437, ph., Garrett & Singer (1998)

19. 28 May–05 Jun 1996

male

El Centro IMP

1996-122

22

 

20. 10 Jun 1998

female

Pt. Loma SD

1999-044

24,30

accepted on re-review

21. 07 Feb–13 Mar 1999

female

Costa Mesa ORA

1999-078

27,31

ph., accepted on re-review

22. 31 Jul 1999

AHY male

Yucca Valley SBE

1999-130

25

ph.

23. 27 May 2002

male

vic. Palo Verde IMP

2002-105

28

one of two reported

 

Pyrrhuloxia – Not accepted, identification not established

31 Mar–02 Apr 1988

 

Escondido SD

1988-117

14

 

27 May 2002

 

vic. Palo Verde IMP

2002-105

28

see table entry 23

01 Sep 2002

 

Jacumba SD

2002-206

28

 

 

Pyrrhuloxia – Not submitted

10 Feb–29 Mar 1953

 

Mecca RIV

 

14

AFN 7:236

07 May 1961

 

Cottonwood Spring RIV

 

14

AFN 15:440

and summer 1961

2

 

 

 

AFN 15:494

28 Apr 1974

 

s end Salton Sea IMP

 

14

AB 28:854

23 Dec 1977

 

Brock Research Center IMP

 

14

AB 32:401, Garrett & Dunn (1981)

17 Mar 1986

 

San Diego SD

 

 

AB 40:525

30 Jul 1996

 

vic. Westmorland IMP

 

 

FN 50:998

12 Apr 1999

 

Costa Mesa ORA

 

 

NAB 53:331, different location from 1999-078, see table entry 21

01 Jun 1999

 

Newport Beach ORA

 

 

NAB 53:434

 

 

 

 

 

Figures

Image3131.TIF

Figure 437. Pyrrhuloxias have twice been found attempting to nest at Chemehuevi Wash in eastern San Bernardino County. This female, photographed on 29 May 1995, participated in the second effort (1995-056; Don Roberson).

 

 

 

 

 

Pyrrhuloxia

PYRRHULOXIA Cardinalis sinuata Bonaparte, 1838

Accepted: 23 (88%)

Treated in Appendix H: no

Not accepted: 3

CBRC review: all records

Not submitted/reviewed: 9

Color image: none

This species’ northwestern subspecies, C. s. fulvescens, occupies the Sonoran Desert of southern Arizona south to northern Nayarit and western Durango; C. s. sinuatus occupies the Chihuahuan Desert from extreme southwestern Arizona east to south-central Texas and south through the Mexican Plateau to northern Michoacán and Querétaro; and C. s. peninsulae occupies Baja California Sur. Birds disperse generally short distances north and east of the breeding range but have strayed much farther, yielding records from southern Nevada, central and northern Arizona, northern New Mexico, western Oklahoma, northern and east-central Texas, Colorado, Kansas, and south-central Montana. The Ontario Bird Records Committee accepted the identification of a first-winter female photographed in southern Ontario during the period 23 December 2004–1 January 2005 but deferred making a final decision as to its wild status (Crins 2006). Patten (2006) identified a pattern of fall/winter vagrancy north and east of the species’ range versus spring/summer vagrancy to the west, a difference that might be explained by eastern sinuatus breeding and dispersing earlier than western fulvescens.

California’s first Pyrrhuloxia was a male that returned to Heise Springs, located north of Westmorland in Imperial County, for three consecutive winters starting in 1971 (McCaskie 1971b). After one more winter record from Imperial County came a string of 18 Pyrrhuloxias between 7 May and 31 July. All but a handful of the state’s accepted records come from the Colorado and Mojave Deserts, and two involve breeding attempts at Chemehuevi Wash, a tributary to the Colorado River located south of Needles in San Bernardino County. The first attempt, in 1977, was by a single pair; the second attempt, in 1995, involved a pair plus two nearby unmated males. The species occurs only irregularly in the Mohawk and Castle Dome Mts. of southwestern Arizona (Monson and Phillips 1981) and in the lower Colorado River Valley (Rosenberg et al. 1991). Recent field work for the Arizona Breeding Bird Atlas yielded no sightings within 60 miles of the California border (Corman and Wise-Gervais 2005).

The following coastal slope records fit the established pattern of spring/summer vagrancy: Corona, Riverside County, 23 July 1982 (two birds); Encinitas, San Diego County, 26–27 May 1983; San Miguel Island, Santa Barbara County, 19–23 July 1990; and Pt. Loma, San Diego County, 10 June 1998. The last of these, involving a “ragged” female, was not accepted during initial review due to concerns about proximity to Tijuana and San Diego. The record was, however, accepted upon re-review because it fit with the overall coastal pattern and because year-old Pyrrhuloxias normally look somewhat worn at this time of year. Another record that the Committee initially failed to endorse—the unique coastal winter record of a female present 7 February–14 March 1999 in Costa Mesa, Orange County—was also accepted at a later time.

Pyrrhuloxias do not share the Northern Cardinal’s history of large-scale importation into California, and far fewer of them are sold in northwestern Baja California, although up to five per day have been encountered in pet shops there (Hamilton 2001). As with any species generally believed to occur in California both naturally and as an escapee, determining natural occurrence for any given record—particularly in cities and close to the international border—is problematic. Unitt (2004) lamented the ever-increasing difficulty of divining the provenance of Mexican songbirds in San Diego County.

 

[YELLOW GROSBEAK Pheucticus chrysopeplus (Vigors, 1832) – see hypothetical section and Appendix H]